Dr. Rebecca Boyd

Rebecca Boyd
Title:
Part-time Faculty for Latin
Office:
657
Address:
Rome Hall
801 22nd St NW
Washington, District Of Columbia 20052
Phone:
202-994-6125
Fax:
202-994-2156
Email:
[email protected]

Areas of Expertise

Latin pedagogy

Latin literature

Conducting empirical research on classical languages

Dr. Rebecca Boyd specializes in Latin pedagogy and Latin literature. She uses both quantitative and qualitative research methods to investigate research questions related to Latin pedagogy. Her interests include Latin reading strategies, strategy-based instruction, and discourse markers. Dr. Boyd’s interest in helping students of Latin become better readers arose from the years she spent as a Latin teacher in high schools in both Massachusetts and Virginia. In 2016, Dr. Boyd earned her doctorate in Curriculum and Instruction from The George Washington University Graduate School of Education, with a focus on second language acquisition. While a doctoral student, she taught “Second Language Instruction” to preservice modern and classical language teachers. Her dissertation, entitled “High School Students’ Comprehension Strategies for Reading Latin Literature,” applied modern second language acquisition research to Latin pedagogy, and she continues to present papers and publish on this topic. Dr. Boyd attended the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies, earned a fellowship to the American School of Classical Studies in Athens, and studied with Fr. Reginald Foster at the final session of his Aestiva Romae Latinitas in Rome. 

Education

2016 George Washington University Graduate School of Education, Ed. D. in Curriculum and Instruction. 

2000, Harvard University Graduate School of Education, Ed. M. in Teaching and Curriculum (Latin and Classical Humanities).

1999, Columbia University, M.A. in Latin.

1998, Tufts University, B.A. in Latin and Greek, summa cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa. 

Publications

Boyd, R. (2018). Latin students’ bottom-up and top-down strategies for reading Latin literature and the impact of cross-linguistic influence. Journal of Latin Linguistics, 17(2): 301–332.

Classes Taught

Intermediate Latin 2001 & 2002

Major Latin Authors I and II